This game is dedicated to the ๐Ÿ“ of my life.

Introducing Melee (The game of Adversarial Prompting)

The humans and the AIs compete imaginarily, together.

This is no longer a game of training an AI to improve, but rather, to compete as equals, with a level playing field, i.e. at prompt engineering and with the semiotic function.

engine
http://github.com/semiosis/engines/blob/master/engines/human.engine
The Imitation Game
https://academic.oup.com/mind/article/LIX/236/433/986238
Exquisite corpse
http://gracabrohm.blogspot.com/2011/12/drawinggame.html

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Melee
    A confused fight or scuffle.
    "several people were hurt in the Melee"

    A confused crowd of people.
    "the Melee of people that were always
    thronging the streets"

games
    [technique]

    Games are important not only as a form of
    recreation but as a method of
    investigation.

    The intention is to cut away the
    constraints of rationalism and allow
    concepts to develop more freely and in a
    more random manner.

    The aim is to break traditional thought
    patterns and create a more original
    outcome.

    Old games such as Exquisite corpse, and
    newer ones, notably Time Travelers'
    Potlatch and Parallel Collage, have played
    a critical role.

    Examples:
    - Time Travelers' Potlatch
    - Exquisite corpse
    - Parallel Collage

exquisite corpse
cadavre exquis
    [technique]
    [game]

    A method by which a collection of words or
    images are collectively assembled, the
    result being known as the exquisite corpse
    or cadavre exquis in French.

    Later the game was adapted to drawing and
    collage.

    It is based on an old parlour game known
    by the same name (and also as
    Consequences) in which players wrote in
    turn on a sheet of paper, folded it to
    conceal part of the writing, and then
    passed it to the next player for a further
    contribution.

    A game in which each participant takes
    turns writing or drawing on a sheet of
    paper, folds it to conceal his or her
    contribution, then passes it to the next
    player for a further contribution.

    The game gained popularity in artistic
    circles during the 1920s, when it was
    adopted as a technique by artists of the
    Surrealist movement.

Time Travelers' Potlatch
    [game]

    A game in which two or more players say
    what gift they would give to another
    person - this is usually an historical
    person who played a role in, or had an
    influence on, the formation of Surrealism.

    Each player indicates the gift that she/he
    would present to various historical,
    mythical, or fictional figures on the
    occasion of their meeting.

    A surrealist game in which two or more
    players say what gift they would give to
    another, usually historical, personage.

    https://peculiarmormyrid.com/807-2/#:~:text=In%20Time%2DTravelers'%20Potlatch%2C,the%20occasion%20of%20their%20meeting.

Parallel Collage
    [game]
    [surrealist game]

    Requires a minimum of 3 players.

    Each player gives 2 graphic images and 2
    lines of poetic text to the other players.

    All players then use the images and lines
    of text (including their own) to construct
    a collage-image and collage-poem.

    In the process of construction, a player
    can modify any item, in any way desired.

    Until everyone is finished, each person's
    work is kept hidden.

    When all images and poems are complete,
    they are shared among the players, with a
    comparison of the results.

    https://www.zazie.at/Collaborations/ParallelCollage_6er/00_WebPages/ParallelCollageMenu.html

Melee facilities aribtrary interlocutors and interrogators as aribtrary combinations of humans, different LMs, and LM personalities.

For example:

  • Human Interrogator

    • Two different language models assume one of the 2 roles of true X or true Y
    • The human interrogator
  • AI Interrogator

    • The language model may be the interrogator
    • The language model also takes one of the roles of true X or true Y
    • The human takes one of the roles true X or true Y

In this way, we can test the AI’s ability to determine who is true X and who is true Y.

  • Game modes:

    • Imitation game
    • Exquisite corpse
    • Surreal art interpretation
      • Given an artwork, humans and AIs each describe it
      • One player is the judge, and they give points to each player depending on how much they like the interpretation
  • Other possibilities:

    • AI Jury
    • Human Jury
      • Networked Pen.el

Imitation game

  • Add a bunch of players. Some of these may be AIs.

  • A list of names is given to the interrogator.

  • A conversational exchange happens inside Mad Tea-Party

  • After 1 minute of talking the chat room is closed

  • It’s then up to the interrogator to decide who is who

  • Try to convince the interrogator you are who you say you are

    • It is unknown if the AI or Human starts

Exquisite corpse

  • As many AIs as you want can be added to the game.

  • Before the game, a sequential list of sections is provided

    • In the case of a story:
      • Introduction
      • Part 1
      • Part 2
      • Part 3
      • Conclusion

In the end, the players get to see the exquisite corpse produced.

  • Players know only:
    • what section of the story they are writing
    • the last sentence of the previous player.

[surreal] art interpretation

X and Y are presented with a work of surreal art and both must compete to describe it as best they can to the interrogator.

The interrogator may be an AI.

Imitation game - further thoughts

The new form of the problem can be described in terms of a game which we call the ‘imitation game’.

It is played with three people,

  • a man (A),
  • a woman (B), and
  • an interrogator (C) (who may be of either sex).

The interrogator stays in a room apart from the other two.

The object of the game for the interrogator is to determine which of the other two is the man and which is the woman.

He knows them by labels X and Y, and at the end of the game he says either ‘X is A and Y is B’ or ‘X is B and Y is A’.

The interrogator is allowed to put questions to A and B thus:

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C: Will X please tell me the length of his or her hair?

Now suppose X is actually A, then A must answer. It is A’s object in the game to try and cause C to make the wrong identification.

His answer might therefore be:

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'My hair is shingled, and the longest strands are about nine inches long.'

We now ask the question, ‘What will happen when a machine takes the part of A in this game?’

Will the interrogator decide wrongly as often when the game is played like this as he does when the game is played between a man and a woman?

These questions replace our original, ‘Can machines think?’

Syzygy

A linking word game by Lewis Carroll, published in The Lady magazine.

In addition to his famous creations portrayed in “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” Lewis Carroll was known for his fondness of word puzzles and logic games.

In 1879, Carroll noted in his diary that he had created a new type of word puzzle he called “syzygies.”

The objective was to turn one word into another by changing letters according to logical rules.

For example, “walrus” can be turned into “carpenter,” like so:

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  walrus                     *mel**
     | |                      | |
   peruse                     melee
   | |                        | |
harper
 |  |
carpenter                  shane

When two words both contain the same set of one or more consecutive letters, a “syzygy” is formed.

A set of four or more words with syzygies between every two is called a “chain,” with each word between the two end words called a “link.”

I think the way I’ll make this will work is:

  • One player/AI gives the next player/AI the first and final words
  • The next player/AI has to fill it
  • Perhaps several people can play and the one with the shortest number of links gets the most points

Also, I will add parlour games

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parlour
parlor game
    A group game played indoors using speech
    (from French Parler).

    They were often played in a parlour.

    These games were extremely popular among
    the upper and middle classes in Great
    Britain and in the United States during
    the Victorian era.

    Examples:
    - Aesop's Mission
    - Are you there, Moriarty?
    - Carnelli
    - Charades
    - Consequences
    - Fictionary
    - Huckle buckle beanstalk
    - Hunt the thimble
    - I packed my bag
    - I spy
    - Kim's Game
    - Mafia
    - The Minister's Cat
    - Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon
    - Twenty questions[6]
    - Wink murder

Others

Chainpoems

This is like exquisite corpse for phrases and imagism combined.

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chainpoems
    Became the principal method of authorial
    evasion.

    Here, different lines were written by
    different writers, often without sight of
    the previous contributions.

    Alternatively, lines were written
    separately and then randomly assembled and
    published.

    Or a line was written a word at a time,
    with the syntactic category (article,
    adjective, noun, verb, article, adjective,
    noun) specified, such as:
    - 'The winged vapour seduces the locked
      bird',
    - 'A corset in July is worth a horde of
      rats',
    - 'Faithful as a boneless cat'.

    Issues 9 and 10 of La Rรฉvolution
    Surrรฉaliste in October 1927 introduced
    these techniques with many examples of its
    product.

Pure-mode

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Pure automatism should not involve any editing, redrafting, or even
semi-conscious shaping of the material as it pours from the pen. The idea is
that the writer should be as surprised by the output as anyone else.

impure automatism

Duchamp abandoned the attempt at automatism when he realised that one part of his mind was surreptitiously shaping what he was writing and making.

  • Bring it on – minimise it by adding GPT-3

  • Automatic writing is no more than the re-introduction of objective chance into language, whereas objective chance is the automatic writing of fate in seemingly raw facts.